Eusocialism – The Age of Unity

June 24, 2020
3 min read

Eusocial creatures operate as single super-organisms, with each individual playing a role into the well-being of the entire colony. Commonly observed in ants, termites, bees, some mole rats, and some crustaceans, these creatures all work together as one. In these such colonies, there are typically single “Queen” beings, fertilized by few males that populate their entire structures.

At some point before reproductive maturity, eusocial individuals become fixed into a particular behavioral group, limiting to either reproductive or labor purposes. This prevents them from transitioning between behavioral groups and creates an animal society that is truly dependent on each other for survival and reproductive success.

Controversially, it has been argued that humans are eusocial creatures as well, working together against evolutionary pressure. These claims have been disputed. However, because humans do not exhibit the exact behaviors found in eusocial societies, does not definitively exclude them from the possibility of adhering to a different class of eusocialism.

Human societies and eusocial societies have exhibited some identical behaviors, generally applied across various specific evolutionary systems, such as “nothing fights” and collaboration. The infrastructure of human societies are typically much more sophisticated than that of insects, so understandably would likely prefer not being compared to the likes of such.

As we evolve beyond the age of pride in humans and into an age of neutrality and willingness, I predict that we will display more eusocialistic ideals, as we continue to work more optimally in larger groups, until we arrive to a single unified symbiosis.

A single human being may be considered a super-organism, relying on bacteria and cell functions to operate; typically recovering after a portion is removed or experiencing fatality if enough specific components are inoperable – such as blood cells. Humanity itself may also resemble super-organisms when observed as single entities. Primitive humans relied on cooperation in tribes to survive the evolutionary pressure. Independent humans simply could not live as optimally alone compared to collected humans, and so evolved into a social species. Now, an independent human may thrive after utilizing the technology made available by other human discoveries, being either tools, concepts, or philosophy. You could not be reading this article without the prior technological advancements that must have happened for this to be possible. From linguistics and the technology of communication, to the efficiency of which we may communicate, we rely on what our ancestors have built for us today to operate and continue to evolve.

As we enter an age of unified consciousness, methods of communication are beginning to rival that of a eusocial species. We may communicate with anyone, at any time, instantly. With data communication becoming increasingly fine and exponentially more efficient, the thoughts and ideas of one to another are becoming increasingly indistinguishable. As we continue to investigate the source of our experience, we become increasingly connected to it.

Exploitation is a human specialty – obtaining the best, most optimal experience from everything we can. Connecting to the source of our experience allows us to exploit it’s potential. Human ego would propose that this may be merely for our own advantage, but that removes us from the possibility that the Earth’s experience itself is not eusocial – with specific individual components serving the purpose of supporting the health of the Earth. Much like a human body harboring countless bacteria and cells, we each serve as an entire world to these organisms. The earth harbors countless creatures and beings, serving as the world we experience, and the cosmos harbor countless planets and stars, providing a space for those experiences.

A parasite knows no evil, only survival. It does what it must to live and thrive in the environments it is exposed to. They provide a genuine experience of truth that is generally less agreeable to those being leeched from. An agreement must arrive, with which one side submits to the other. Either the parasite wins and is able to thrive on which it is leeching from, or the host wins and is able to thwart off the parasite, ensuring it’s own survival. Rarely, a symbiotic agreement is met as the primitive biology restricts evolutionary success in both parties; one must dominate the other. Nature eats. Though, what if an organism exists only to be eaten? Such continues the cycle of life: everything comes from and returns to the ground on Earth. To what extent, we have yet to conclude.

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